Tag Archives: interesting art

Escape Plan Review

Written by Micah Messer

Playstation Vita launched with a pretty fantastic lineup, consisting of over 20 physical and downloadable titles. Escape Plan, made by some of the minds behind the PSN title, Fat Princess, is definitely one of the most promising games among that group. A puzzler that makes full use of the Vita’s front and back touch pads to the extent that buttons aren’t used at all. It takes a bit to get used to, but this game is well worth it. Its presentation is undeniably unique and filled with charm, and the game itself is a joy to play. Oh, and it’s only $15 on the PSN.

The best way to describe Escape Plan’s appearance would be to say it’s a mixture of Limbo and LittleBigPlanet. Limbo, for its eerie, black and white tone– LBP for its fun, light-hearted main characters, Lil and Laarg. In addition to Escape Plan’s excellent visual style, it also has fantastic sound design. The game features a classical score including the likes of In the Hall of the Mountain King, and Mozart’s Rondo Alla Turca. There’s also some jazzy tunes thrown in that fit the black and white art style perfectly. The game also uses the classic laugh, gasp and clap tracks as if there were a live studio audience watching Lil and Laarg stumble their way through Bakuki’s Lair.

I’ll bet you can guess who’s who.

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Wind Waker Retro Opinion

Written by Nathan Love

The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker is the dark horse of the Zelda console family. If the recent Zelda games were presidents, Ocarina of Time would be George Washington, Twilight Princess would be the evil twin of George Washington, and Wind Waker would be like, say, Zachary Taylor. Sure, Wind Waker is oft-maligned by fans, but it held the Union together against Southern separatists by force. Wait, no, I mean, it was a creative and inventive Zelda game at a time (one could argue that still continues today) when Nintendo realized it could make a whole lot of money by capitalizing on its legacies.

Everyone knows Wind Waker gets a lot of hate. Before it even came out, when screen caps were released, fans began mocking referring to it as “Cel-da” and “That damn cartoon Link crap”. People were hungering for the epic sequel to Ocarina of Time that Majora’s Mask came so tantalizingly close to offering, and Wind Waker definitely did not provide that. It was Twilight Princess, three years later, that would give the fandom what it had been clamoring for, and bafflingly enough, would be a far less interesting game than Wind Waker.

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LittleBigPlanet Review

Written by Nathan Love

LittleBigPlanet is one of the core exclusive franchises for the PlayStation 3, and it doesn’t take much brainpower to figure out why. Announced back in 2007 with a release date of October 2008, LittleBigPlanet has since garnered nearly universal acclaim among the gaming community and critics alike, as well as selling nearly four and a half million copies worldwide. Described as one of the PS3’s “killer apps”, LittleBigPlanet is a fun, quirky, and gorgeous puzzle-platformer and creative tool that appeals to a wide variety of casual and hardcore gamers alike.

Right off the bat, the tutorials (narrated by the illustrious Stephen Fry) set the tone for the rest of the game. Your character, an adorable little Sackperson, can jump, push and pull objects, and animate in a variety of endearing and hilarious ways. The level design is, at heart, fairly standard puzzle-platforming fare; you must navigate your character from point A to point B, with various obstacles to avoid and overcome in your way. There are points to collect, harrowing jumps to be had, checkpoints after major struggles, and a goal at the end of every level- in every way, it is the very model of the genre.

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Limbo Review

Written by Micah Messer 
In a 2D puzzle-platformer game, your goal is generally to manipulate your environment in a way that gets you from point A to point B. These are the fundamentals of the genre, and this is how Limbo functions. It doesn’t re-invent the wheel in any way in terms of gameplay, but it does deliver thought-provoking puzzles, an interesting art style, and outstanding atmosphere all in a disturbing, creepy black and white setting.

Limbo starts you off controlling a young boy waking up on his back in the middle of what appears to be a very dark, eerie wilderness.The game makes no attempt to explain who you are, forcing you to overlook that question for the time being, and set off to explore the aforementioned mysterious forest. It becomes quickly apparent that this is a hostile environment, full of things that kill you, often in horribly gruesome ways. With no real goal to work towards, the only thing you can do is move forward and try to survive.

Are... are you okay?

Are… are you okay?

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